Krysuvik Geothermal Area

 

Krýsuvík is a geothermal area located in southern Rykans in the middle of the rift region of the Atlantic ridge that diagonally crosses Iceland from west and south, to the northeast of the island. Kirswick is one of the high-temperature areas in Iceland. Visitors to the site hike on tree tracks between fiery sulfur springs and bubbling pits of boiling mud.




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Fontana Spa

 

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Fontana Spa in the town of Laugarvatn is a complex of geothermal pools and moist and dry saunas on the edge of Lake Lugarvatn. It is a popular stopover for visitors to the Golden Circle area and is relatively close to the Geyser and Thingvellir Park sites.

The wet saunas

The local inhabitants of the village know and enjoy the healing properties of the geothermal springs in the lake from the beginning of the last century. The Fontana Pond utilizes this natural bath and brings in warm steam and healers that curl directly from the ground to the three saunas. The temperature of the steam varies and ranges from 40-50 degrees depending on the temperature of the steam and the weather. The humidity in the saunas is very high. Saunas floor networks allow guests to hear and smell the natural hot spring boiling beneath them, creating a unique and natural experience.




The geothermal pools

Three mineral pools connected together with varying depth, size and temperature. The pools and hot tubs are perfect for relaxation and fun, and feature stone sculptures made by the Icelandic artist. The top hot tub provides panoramic views of the beautiful surroundings, while the healthy water feeds both body and mind.

Finnish sauna

The Fontana complex also features a Finnish-style sauna room. The temperature is between 80-90 degrees, with low humidity. You can sit and enjoy the beautiful lake view through the large window. The Finns enjoy sauna rooms for centuries, this is a place for them to relax with family and friends, as well as a place for physical and mental relaxation.

Directions




Landbrotalaug

 

Iceland is known for its scenic landscapes, volcanic activity and medicinal baths that vary in shapes and sizes. Most tourist who want to travel through the Golden circle often target the big boys such as Fontana and Blue lagoon geothermal hot springs. However, for those that value their privacy and have a streak of adventure in them, there are still many different options to explore, one such location is Landbrotalaug.

Directions

This is a hot pot that is in a random field by a little pond behind an abandoned farm. The spring itself is located at Snaefellsnes which is the peninsula north of Reykjavik. By car, it’s about 2 hours to the center of Snaefellsnes Peninsula. To the hot pot, it will probably take like an hour. Coming from Reykjavik the ride should take approximately 2 hours.The best part about Landbrotalaug Hot Pot is that there is a website that has the GPS coordinates posted (GPS: N64°49.933 W22°19.110). Basically, if you are driving from Reykjavik towards Snaefellsnes, you will pass Eldborg Crater (on your left). There is literally one main road, so you won’t get lost. After you’ve passed the crater, you’ll see an abandoned farm house up on a hill (Skalg). There’s a road/driveway right before Skalg. Turn left onto that road. You’ll follow the road up and around, past the farm and back into the middle of a field. Once you get a few minutes back into the middle of nowhere, you will see a small sign indicating “Heit Laug Hot Spring”. If you’re lucky, you will be the only car there. Go ahead and park and walk on out to the small pond. Please take caution when crossing the pond. The rock walkway is slippery and moss covered, so you could easily slip and cut yourself. Walking around is probably smarter although for the thrill seekers this might not be an interesting way to explore the pond.

There are two “hot pots” at the pond. Both are on the other side of the pond, so you will either have to walk all the way around or across. One of the hot pots is fed by a pipe where warm water shoots down into a very shallow but larger pool. You could probably fit in a bunch of people in there but you wouldn’t be very covered. If you look towards one end of the pond, you will see a few rocks that look like a makeshift walkway across the pond. If you follow the rocks with your eyes, you’ll see a makeshift rock wall. Behind that rock wall is the mother-load hot pot. It’s small and can just fit two people (maybe 3 if you push it). It’s deeper though and you will be in water up to your neck. It’s also the warmer of the two hot pots here.Landbrotalaug is the best free natural hot pool you can visit in winter in southwest Iceland. It consists of two small intimate pools that can fit no more than a couple of people in each one. People usually skinny dip here so the golden rule is that if you see a car parked, respect people’s privacy and wait until they are finished before you take your turn. The heat in the pool is approximate 44°C and it is just heavenly to chill out in the hot waters when you are surrounded by miles and miles of snow and ice.If you visit the pool at night , you can enjoy a cold beer as the warm water soaks up your skin .From here you can watch the Northern Lights and enjoy the beauty of Iceland first-hand.

Quicktips

  • If you’re coming from Reykjavik, after passing the Eldborg crater on road 54, turn into the dirt road with the sign Stóra Hraun and follow the path to the parking lot
  • Google Co-ordinates that we followed to get there – N64 49.923 W22 19.130
  • Bring a bag for your clothes and large towel, make sure there’s something heavy in the bag so it doesn’t fly away
  • 4×4 or normal car: You can still get there with a regular car
  • Opening hours: It is open throughout the day
  • Lifeguard: There is no need for a lifeguard
  • Prices: It’s free of charge.
  • Parking: Parking is free.
  • Visit with children: The site is family oriented it is possible to take children although due to its size it can only fit 2 to 3 people.
  • Changing rooms: There are no changing rooms in the area.
  • Showers and toilets: There are no showers and toilets.

Brimketill lava rock pool

 

There are hidden geological gems all around Iceland, places where volcanic activity and brutal exposure to the elements form the beautiful phenomena that make this country so unique. You can find hexagonal basalt columns; sea-arches and pillars; towering lava formations; and on the south side of the Reykjanes Peninsula, Brimketill.

According to folklore regarding Brimketill it used to be said that the pool was owned by a giantess, who used it to wash her clothes and bathe. In that time, its name was not ‘the whitewater cauldron’, but ‘Oddný’s pool’, or Oddnýjarlaug, after this character.

Carved by the pounding of waves against soft lava rock, Brimketill is a large, natural pool that sits at the bottom of a cliff at the ocean’s edge. In summer, it is a place of beauty and serenity; in winter, it becomes a place of dramatic wonder.

Directions

Reaching the car park for Brimketill is a different kind of challenge compared to other hot pot locations. To get to them, you have to drive down unmaintained roads covered in so much snow it was extreme caution is advised it does not help that the area is not yet well signposted and may not come up on one of the GPS systems; therefore, keep a keen eye to find out where we should be going. About 10 kilometres from Grindavík, however, you will see a wooden post a short way up a little side road that has been highlighted in fading letters, and thus you will have arrived at your destination. The carpark is just a short drive further. A large section of it was fenced off, with diggers and building materials inside, and we saw some sort of trail that was in the early stages of construction, heading over the edge of the rocky cliff.

The waves against the adjacent cliffs are a magnificent site to behold , calming to the nerves , and provides a refreshing sprinkle of sea spray across your faces.The view from the top of the cliff is and spectacular. Though not particularly high nor particularly steep, great waves were rolling in and smashing against the rocks, throwing spray across our faces and filling the air with the incredible sound of the ocean’s power.While approaching Brimketill from the rocky cliff is quite an adventure, I would caution those who are unsteady on their feet, or who fear heights or the ocean, to wait until the path and platform are constructed before visiting themselves. On your return journey, you can chose to take the long route back, travelling around the edge of the Reykjanes peninsula. Travelling this way from Grindavík, Brimketill is just the first of several interesting locations, which are all conveniently positioned around each other.A few kilometres away, you can find a spectacular geothermal area called Gunnuhver. There are many mud pools and vents here, with thick columns of steam rising high into the air; amongst them, you can see the remains of the old path that collapsed when a hot spring opened beneath it.

Further along is the Reykjanes Lighthouse, overlooking the dangerous, rocky coastland on the peninsula edge, and ahead from there is Miðlína, where you can cross a symbolic bridge between the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates. There are also many volcanoes and craters just off the road.Off this coast on a clear day, you can see the protected island of Eldey, which rises sheerly 77 metres from the surface of the water, and is renowned for hosting one of the world’s largest gannet colonies.

All of these locations are worth a look, especially for anyone on a self-drive tour around Reykjanes. Brimketill is highly recommended locally because of its dramatic location, and the way it changes with the conditions around it. Like most of the other places on the peninsula, it is more accessible during summer; but for those who are sure on their feet and responsible regarding the dangers of the cliff, the whitewater cauldron warrants a visit all the year round.

The folklore relates that the pond was regularly occupied by a giantess named Oddný. The viewing platform overlooking Brimketill is just a few steps away from the parking lot starting with a small set of stairs, making the platform inaccessible to wheelchairs. Standing on the platform you risk the possibility of getting soaked as the waves can almost reach the parking lot. Make sure to watch your step while taking in the amazing view and the unrelenting forces of nature. Utmost caution is recommended, especially when travelling with children. This is because ;

  • There is no safety supervision of the area.
  • Visitors travel at their own risk.
  • The waves can be unpredictable and unexpected.
  • Ocean currents in the area are extremely powerful.
  • Strong blasts of wind can be dangerous and unforeseen.
  • Never leave your child unattended. Hold it at all times on the viewing platform.
  • Entering the sea may be life-threatening.

Krauma, Geothermal Baths & Spa

 

Krauma

Somewhere in western Iceland, about half an hour’s drive west from Borgarnes, is the Krauma Hot Springs site. Opened only at the end of 2017, this is the newest spa experience to be experienced in Iceland. Krauma is a new, world-class geothermal resort that includes two saunas, a relaxation space and five outdoor nature baths that are fed from the large European hot spring Deildartunguhver.

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This is the newest spa experience you can get in Iceland. The spa’s special location adds to the attractiveness of the place. To be more accurate, it is located between authentic Icelandic mountain scenery. The region is famous for the most powerful natural hot springs in Europe. The bath water temperature is regulated to perfect temperature by pouring pure glacier water from the glacier into the nearby Angioccol.




How to get there?

The Krauma Spa is a 90-minute drive from Reykjavik and is open all year. This is a great alternative to the Blue Lagoon. Facilities on site also include a souvenir shop and restaurant. The most interesting and fun part about visiting Krauma is the fact that the waiters serve you directly to the baths. You don’t even have to get out of the hot water and “taste” the weather outside the pools. Just sit back, relax and place your order from the pool.

The spa is adjacent to the nearby natural hot spring and for you to find your way from the road to the place, simply follow the “Deildartunguhver” signage off the road. When you reach the parking area, it is almost unrealistic to find such a modern and luxurious resort in such an isolated area.

Directions

Laugarvatn Fontana

 

Fontana Spa in Laugarvatn town is a complex of geothermal pools and moist and dry saunas on the edge of Lake Lugarvatn. It is a popular stop for visitors to the Golden Circle area and is close to the Geyser and Þingvellir Park sites.

Book Today!

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The damp saunas

The local inhabitants of the village know and enjoy the healing properties of the geothermal springs in the lake from the beginning of the last century. The Fontana Pond utilizes this natural bath and brings in warm steam and healers that curl directly from the ground to the three saunas. The temperature of the steam varies and ranges from 40-50 degrees depending on the temperature of the steam and the weather. The humidity in the saunas is very high. Saunas floor networks allow guests to hear and smell the natural hot spring boiling beneath them, creating a unique and natural experience.

The geothermal pools

Three mineral pools connected together with varying depth, size and temperature. The pools and hot tubs are perfect for relaxation and fun, and feature stone sculptures made by the Icelandic artist. The top hot tub provides panoramic views of the beautiful surroundings, while the healthy water feeds both body and mind.

Finnish sauna

The Fontana complex also features a Finnish-style sauna room. The temperature is between 80-90 degrees, with low humidity. You can sit and enjoy the beautiful lake view through the large window. The Finns enjoy sauna rooms for centuries, this is a place for them to relax with family and friends, as well as a place for physical and mental relaxation.

Directions

The Blue Lagoon

 

The Blue Lagoon, (in Icelandic: “Bláa lónið”) is one of the most famous geothermal spas in the world and one of Iceland’s most popular attractions. Chosen for one of the top ten spas in the world.

blue lagoon

The lagoon was completely created by chance. When in the 1970s, the Svartsengi geothermal power plant began to pour water rich in salt, algae, and silica, which became a kind of calcium. The pool created in the lava field became an attraction among locals after they discovered that water immersion alleviates skin problems especially psoriasis. Today, Blue Lagoon has a large clinic and spa that attracts many tourists every year. The Blue Lagoon is an anchor of economic stability and one of the country’s 300 largest companies.




The hot water in the blue lagoon is rich in minerals like silica and sulfur, hence the blue-greenish color of the water. The warm water coming into the lagoon is pumped from holes in the ground at a depth of 2000 meters, with the steam generated being used as an energy supply by the nearby power plant. The smoke visible from the pool area and the power plant are only water vapor. The water temperature in the lagoon is about 40 ° on average.

How to get there?

The Blue Lagoon is open daily all year round. It is located a few minutes drive from Keflavík Airport between Reykjavík Airport, about 40 minutes drive from Reykjavik. While driving on Route 41 between Reykjavik and Keflavik, try to locate the sign in Icelandic that says “Bláa lóníð” or simply look for the steam vapors coming from the blue lagoon and nearby power plant.

Directions